Hummus

Is a simple, wholesome blend of yummy beans and seeds

- hummus facts -

  • Chickpeas
    Chickpeas

    Also known as garbanzo beans, these tan, round legumes are boiled and mashed to make hummus.

  • Tahini
    Tahini

    This paste, made from lightly roasted and ground sesame seeds, is a dip on its own as well as a key ingredient in traditional hummus.

  • Oil, Garlic & Spices
    Oil, Garlic & Spices

    Olive or vegetable oil create a smooth, creamy consistency. Garlic and salt round out the flavor. 

Healthy Living With Hummus

Did you know that only 2 heaping spoonfuls of hummus a day will fulfill your bean recommendation for the week? Research shows that diets with increased bean consumption are associated with reduced risk of chronic diseases like heart disease1,2, diabetes and obesity3.

Delivers Fiber

a nutrient of concern

Hummus helps boost fiber intake, especially when paired with veggies or whole grains. The mix of soluble and insoluble fiber supports heart health, and the combination of protein, complex carbohydrates and fiber aid in weight management and blood glucose control. 

Plant Protein

and healthy fats in a unique recipe

Dietary guidance highlights the benefits of balancing plant protein foods as part of a healthful dietary pattern. Healthy, unsaturated fats have been shown to sustain cardiovascular health. Specifically in hummus: Chickpeas contribute fiber, protein, iron and B vitamins. Tahini contributes poly- and monounsaturated fats, fiber, protein and minerals.

Boosts Diet  Quality

improve nutritional value of meals

Hummus offers a package of nutrients that can improve nutritional value of meals and snacks, especially when used in place of other calorie-laden spreads, toppings or ingredients. Hummus pairs well with many foods and flavors, making it easy to increase intakes of vegetables, fruits and whole grains.

Complements Dietary Needs

vegetarian and gluten-free 

Sabra hummus is a vegetarian and gluten free food that fits into diets of people with common food allergies. Most of our hummus flavors are nonGMO.

Nourishes Healthy Living

helps with sustained 
energy 

The ingredients and nutrients in Sabra hummus – beans, unsaturated fat, protein and fiber – are associated with supporting good health, such as aiding in weight management and blood glucose stability for sustained energy. 

Hummus and Healthcare Professionals

To help you learn more about the benefits of hummus and its role in a healthy lifestyle, we’ve worked with registered dietitians to create resources for health professionals and with an interest in nutrition science. Feel free to share this exciting news with others and spread the hummus love.

Toolkit
Did you know that just 2 heaping spoonfuls of hummus each day can help you meet the Dietary Guidelines, and that MyPlate recommendations for beans each week which can help reduce the vegetable gap in America? The Sabra Hummus Wellness & Nutrition Registered Dietitian Toolkit contains the history and health benefits of hummus, as well as recipes and easy ways to use hummus each day.

Download Sabra Toolkit

Turnkey Presentation
interested in sharing the health benefits and easy ways to use hummus with your audiences? Then this presentation is for you. You can even customize it to suit your needs, as slides can be used in their entirety or to supplement your own presentation.

Download Presentation

Advisory Board

We’re thrilled to be working with the nutrition research and education experts who make up the Sabra Wellness & Nutrition Advisory Board. This esteemed team of nutrition science and communications professionals have joined forces with Sabra to provide research guidance and nutrition solutions to health professionals and consumers alike.

  • Heather Leidy, PhD
    Heather Leidy, PhD
    Associate Professor & Clinical Research Center (CTSI) Director Dept. Nutrition Science Purdue University
  • Kathleen Zelman, MPH, RD
    Kathleen Zelman, MPH, RD
    Nutrition Communications Specialist
  • David Baer, PHD
    David Baer, PHD
    Research Leader USDA, ARS, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center
  • Robert Murray, MD
    Robert Murray, MD
    Professor of Human Nutrition, The Ohio State University

Research and News

Research Icon News Icon

  • Hummus and Chickpeas

    Hummus and chickpeas are associated with better quality diets and lower occurrence of obesity and other health risk indicators.

    Hummus/chickpeas consumption by US adults was found to be associated with better nutrient profile, diet quality and weight parameters. Total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol were lower, while dietary fiber, vitamin A and C, potassium, magnesium and iron were higher in the diets where hummus and chickpeas were included…

    Hummus/chickpeas consumption by US adults was found to be associated with better nutrient profile, diet quality and weight parameters. Total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol were lower, while dietary fiber, vitamin A and C, potassium, magnesium and iron were higher in the diets where hummus and chickpeas were included. The Hummus/Chickpea user population had significantly higher HEI (Health Eating Index)-2005 scores, significantly lower BMI (Body Mass Index) and smaller waist circumference.

    These findings suggest that hummus/chickpea consumption, in common with other pulses, should be encouraged by health professionals as part of an overall healthy diet.

    This research was partially supported by Sabra; Sabra did not have input in the study design, interpretation of the results and drafting the manuscript

  • Fruits and Vegetables

    Eat your fruits and vegetables. research links this with lower incidence of stroke and cardiovascular mortality.

    The objective of this work was to examine the relation between legume consumption and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The research showed a significant inverse relationship between legume intake and the risk of CHD, and suggests that increasing legume intake may be an important part of a dietary approach to the primary prevention of CHD in the general population…

    The objective of this work was to examine the relation between legume consumption and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The research showed a significant inverse relationship between legume intake and the risk of CHD, and suggests that increasing legume intake may be an important part of a dietary approach to the primary prevention of CHD in the general population.

    Consuming legumes four or more times a week compared to less than once a week was strongly associated with 22 percent lower risk of CHD, and 11 percent lower risk of cardiovascular disease.

  • Hummus Packaging

    Hummus’ unique “package” delivers glycemic stability.

    This study was conducted to explore the effects of hummus on blood glucose and insulin levels in healthy individuals. Pulses are low glycemic index (GI) foods and have been associated with reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes and some cancers…

    This study was conducted to explore the effects of hummus on blood glucose and insulin levels in healthy individuals. Pulses are low glycemic index (GI) foods and have been associated with reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes and some cancers.

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Additional Research Resources

1. Hornick BA, Weiss L. Comparative nutrient analysis of commonly consumed vegetables: support for recommending a nutrition education approach emphasizing specific vegetables to improve nutrient intakes. Nutr Today. 2011; 46(3):130-137.

2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. December 2015. Available at http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/

3 O’Neil CE, Nicklas TA, Fulgoni VL. Chickpeas and hummus are associated with better nutrient intake, diet quality, and levels of some cardiovascular risk factors: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2010. J Nutr Food Sci. 2014; 4(1):254. doi.org/10.4172/2155-9600.1000254.

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